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Sharon421
Calcite | Level 5

I have a SAS data set with a numeric variable (not date) with values like 20140815.  How can I turn this into a SAS date number that I willl eventually want in the format of MMDDYY8.  ?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Astounding
PROC Star

More specifically, the conversion would look like this:

 

newvar = input(put(oldvar,8.), yymmdd8.);

 

Then apply any date format you would like.  Any of these examples (and more) would be possible:

 

format newvar date9.;

format newvar yymmdd10.;

format newvar mmddyy8.;

format newvar mmddyys10.;

 

Experiment, till you find a format that you like.

 

Good luck.

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5 REPLIES 5
LinusH
Tourmaline | Level 20

Use a combination of put() and input() functions.

Data never sleeps
Astounding
PROC Star

More specifically, the conversion would look like this:

 

newvar = input(put(oldvar,8.), yymmdd8.);

 

Then apply any date format you would like.  Any of these examples (and more) would be possible:

 

format newvar date9.;

format newvar yymmdd10.;

format newvar mmddyy8.;

format newvar mmddyys10.;

 

Experiment, till you find a format that you like.

 

Good luck.

CharlotteCain
Quartz | Level 8

Hi Bob, May i request you to please enlighten me on the differences between applying $w. format and just like 8. format without the dollar sign. Also,  does applying an x amount of width caters to values less than the number of bytes in the value?

This confuses me big time:(

 

Sorry for the bother and merry christmas and happy new year to you,

Charlotte

Astounding
PROC Star

Charlotte,

 

The $w formats expect to find character strings as the incoming values.  Leave out the dollar sign and the software expects a numeric as the incoming value.

 

If you specify a width that is wider than the numeric value:

 

newvar = put(12345678, 10.);

 

You get a leading blank (or as many leading blanks as needed) to fill out the resulting string.  Note that the PUT function always returns a character string regardless of whether the format is numeric or character.

 

When in doubt, experiment.  You can always check your results with something like this:

 

newvar2 = '*' || newvar || '*';

put newvar2=;

 

People who are trying to learn are never a bother.  Merry Christmas to you as well.

 

 

Sharon421
Calcite | Level 5

This seems simple on the surface but I could not figure it out.  This was a GREAT help.

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