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Xpcutebear
Fluorite | Level 6

Hello, I am a complete novice at SAS and I use the university edition. One of my assignments was to add a Descriptive Analysis based on assignment. Can anyone give me like a dummified definition of what a descriptive analysis is? And maybe like a tutorial on how to add them as well? 

 

Thanks,

A Fellow Highschool Kid

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Rick_SAS
SAS Super FREQ

A descriptive analysis refers to computing statistics such as means, standard deviation, min, max,...  Look back in your notes and see if there are examples of using PROC MEANS (or PROC UNIVARIATE) to compute basic statistics for each variable.

 

For example, the following call to PROC MEANS computes some basic statistics for each numerical variable in the Sashelp.Class data:

 

proc means data=Sashelp.Class Min Mean Std Max  ndec=3;
var Age Height Weight;
run;

 

 

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7 REPLIES 7
Xpcutebear
Fluorite | Level 6
Also is Descriptive Statistics the same thing?
PaigeMiller
Diamond | Level 26

The only thing I can think of is that it is the same as "descriptive statistics".

--
Paige Miller
Ksharp
Super User
Yes. I think so.
descriptive analysis is just asking you to calculate some statistic like : MEADIAN MEAN STD FREQ .......

A classic descriptive analysis is univariate three panel analysis.

proc univariate data=have plots;
var amount;
histogram amount/kernel;
run;

@Rick_SAS wrote several blogs about it .
ballardw
Super User

@Xpcutebear wrote:
Also is Descriptive Statistics the same thing?

Might be a jargon thing for some groups.

In my training "analysis" means some person has looked at the information and added some value to raw information.

 

A table of statistics is way to provide some description.

Analysis would add something like "change/no change from previous/expected values" or perhaps an impact.

 

Your $0.02 may vary.

Rick_SAS
SAS Super FREQ

A descriptive analysis refers to computing statistics such as means, standard deviation, min, max,...  Look back in your notes and see if there are examples of using PROC MEANS (or PROC UNIVARIATE) to compute basic statistics for each variable.

 

For example, the following call to PROC MEANS computes some basic statistics for each numerical variable in the Sashelp.Class data:

 

proc means data=Sashelp.Class Min Mean Std Max  ndec=3;
var Age Height Weight;
run;

 

 

BrianGaines
SAS Employee

Hi @Xpcutebear,

 

To build on what has already been said, I also encourage you to check out the SAS Studio tasks. The tasks are point-and-click interfaces that enable you to use SAS for data prep and various analyses without writing any code. Instead, as you navigate a task's menus and options, the underlying SAS code is
automatically generated for you in real time.  

 

You access the tasks from the "Tasks and Utilities" section of the navigation pane on the left:

tasks.PNG

 

For your situation, the "Summary Statistics" task in the Statistics category should be helpful.  The "Characterize Data" task in the Data category and the "Data Exploration" task in the Statistics category might also be useful.

 

I hope this helps!

 

Best,

 

-Brian

Xpcutebear
Fluorite | Level 6

Thank you all for the help!

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