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ChrisWoo
Obsidian | Level 7

I'm wondering if I misunderstood the %put macro statement.

Why I cant get "Option C" in my output table?

 

 

%macro testing;
%let g_nobs=100000;

%if &g_nobs = 0 %then %do;
	%put Option A;
%end;

%if 1 < &g_nobs and &g_nobs <= 10000 %then %do;
	%put Option B;
%end;

%if &g_nobs > 10000 %then %do;
	%put Option C;
%end;
%mend testing;



proc sql;
	create table haha (text char);
	insert into haha values ("&g_nobs");

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Quentin
Super User

The %PUT statement is simply for writing values to the SAS log.  If you run the macro by submitting %testing, it will write Option C to the SAS log.

 

It sound like you might be wanting to make a function-style macro that will return a bit of text, in this case it would return the text Option C, is that right?

 

This macro will return the text Option C:

 

%macro foo;
  Option C
%mend foo;

You could use like:

%macro foo;
  Option C
%mend foo;

proc sql;
	create table haha (text char);
	insert into haha values ("%foo")
;
quit ;

If you the macro to decide which text to return based on some value, typically you would add a parameter to the macro rather than use a global macro variable.  This could be done like:

 

%macro testing(nobs=);
%if &nobs = 0 %then %do;
	Option A  /*return*/
%end;
%else %if 1 < &nobs and &nobs <= 10000 %then %do;
	Option B  /*return*/
%end;
%else %if &nobs > 10000 %then %do;
 Option C   /*return*/
%end;
%mend testing;

proc sql;
	create table haha (text char);
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=0)")     ;
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=5000)")  ;
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=15000)") ;
quit ;

 

BASUG is hosting free webinars Next up: Mike Sale presenting Data Warehousing with SAS April 10 at noon ET. Register now at the Boston Area SAS Users Group event page: https://www.basug.org/events.

View solution in original post

7 REPLIES 7
Quentin
Super User

The %PUT statement is simply for writing values to the SAS log.  If you run the macro by submitting %testing, it will write Option C to the SAS log.

 

It sound like you might be wanting to make a function-style macro that will return a bit of text, in this case it would return the text Option C, is that right?

 

This macro will return the text Option C:

 

%macro foo;
  Option C
%mend foo;

You could use like:

%macro foo;
  Option C
%mend foo;

proc sql;
	create table haha (text char);
	insert into haha values ("%foo")
;
quit ;

If you the macro to decide which text to return based on some value, typically you would add a parameter to the macro rather than use a global macro variable.  This could be done like:

 

%macro testing(nobs=);
%if &nobs = 0 %then %do;
	Option A  /*return*/
%end;
%else %if 1 < &nobs and &nobs <= 10000 %then %do;
	Option B  /*return*/
%end;
%else %if &nobs > 10000 %then %do;
 Option C   /*return*/
%end;
%mend testing;

proc sql;
	create table haha (text char);
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=0)")     ;
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=5000)")  ;
	insert into haha values ("%testing(nobs=15000)") ;
quit ;

 

BASUG is hosting free webinars Next up: Mike Sale presenting Data Warehousing with SAS April 10 at noon ET. Register now at the Boston Area SAS Users Group event page: https://www.basug.org/events.
ChrisWoo
Obsidian | Level 7

I would like to seek your help again on my %if condition.

I tried to modified abit from previous code, but why I cant get my result "F" even if today_day = 12.

 

%let PrevMonth = %sysfunc(intnx(month,%sysfunc(today()),-1,s),mmddyy2.);
%let Today_day = %sysfunc(intnx(day,%sysfunc(today()),0,s),ddmmyy2.);
%macro testing(date=&Today_day); %if 1 <= &date < 3 %then %do; T /*return*/ %end; %else %if 3 <= &date <= 31 %then %do; F /*return*/ %end; %mend testing; proc sql; create table haha (text char); insert into haha values ("%testing(date=&today_day)"); quit ;
Quentin
Super User

The macro language evaluates:

1 <= &date < 3

As being

(1 <= &date)  <  3

In the macro language, you can't do that chained comparison thing.  Try:

(1 <= &date) and (&date < 3)

(Parentheses are optional here, but help clarify the intent.)

BASUG is hosting free webinars Next up: Mike Sale presenting Data Warehousing with SAS April 10 at noon ET. Register now at the Boston Area SAS Users Group event page: https://www.basug.org/events.
Quentin
Super User

Side note, if just want to see what the macro returns, that is when you can use a %PUT statement, outside of the macro.  So instead of using SQL to see a value, you can run the macro and look at your log.  Code like:

 

%macro testing(date= );
%if (1 <= &date) and (&date < 3) %then %do;
	T  /*return*/
%end;
%else %if (3 <= &date) and (&date <= 31) %then %do;
	F  /*return*/
%end;
%mend testing;

%put date=2 returns: %testing(date=2) ;
%put date=8 returns: %testing(date=8) ;
%put date=today() returns: %testing(date=%sysfunc(day(%sysfunc(today()))) ) ;

 

 

BASUG is hosting free webinars Next up: Mike Sale presenting Data Warehousing with SAS April 10 at noon ET. Register now at the Boston Area SAS Users Group event page: https://www.basug.org/events.
ChrisWoo
Obsidian | Level 7
Thx, that is helpful
ballardw
Super User

Also, the macro variable g_nobs is LOCAL to the macro testing. So it no longer exists after the %testing macro stops executing.

Tom
Super User Tom
Super User

@ballardw wrote:

Also, the macro variable g_nobs is LOCAL to the macro testing. So it no longer exists after the %testing macro stops executing.


That macro did NOT define G_NOBS as LOCAL.  It will only create a local macro variable if there is not already a macro variable with that name.

 

So if you want to see the value after the macro has finished running just make sure you have created a macro variable named G_NOBS before you call the macro.

 

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